Unknown Pleasures

yama-bato:

Mary Delany
Mary Delany (Drawn by); Aeschelus Hippocastanum (Heptandria Monogynia), formerly in an album (Vol.I, 7); Horse Chestnut. 1776 
via

yama-bato:

Mary Delany

Mary Delany (Drawn by); Aeschelus Hippocastanum (Heptandria Monogynia), formerly in an album (Vol.I, 7); Horse Chestnut. 1776 

via

yama-bato:

Designation: Deity trees (shenmu) in Taiwan. Artist: Zhang Daqian. Chinese, 1899-1983 Date: 1970. Medium: Ink and colors on paper . Place of Origin: Taiwan | United States Credit Line: Gift of the artist. Label: Zhang Daqian painted this work during a 1970 visit to Taiwan, where many of his friends lived.
via

yama-bato:

Designation: Deity trees (shenmu) in Taiwan. Artist: Zhang Daqian. Chinese, 1899-1983
Date: 1970. Medium: Ink and colors on paper . Place of Origin: Taiwan | United States
Credit Line: Gift of the artist. Label: Zhang Daqian painted this work during a 1970 visit to Taiwan, where many of his friends lived.

via

“So plant your own gardens and decorate your own soul, instead of waiting for someone to bring you flowers.”

— Jorge Luis Borges  (via thatkindofwoman)

(via yama-bato)

sakrogoat:

Steve & Chris Rocks - Northern Lights

sakrogoat:

Steve & Chris Rocks - Northern Lights

(via theunfinishedimage)

imagediver:

Detail from Georg Gisze, by Hans Holbein the Younger, s.d.
Click on the image to see the detail in a zoomable context.

imagediver:

Detail from Georg Gisze, by Hans Holbein the Younger, s.d.

Click on the image to see the detail in a zoomable context.

(via yama-bato)

slickwhippet:

Gustave Doré, Catastrophe du Mont Cervin (1865).  Mont Cervin, French appellation for the Matterhorn.  Hadow, Croz, Hudson and Douglas fall to their deaths following the first successful ascent; the Taugwalder father and son and Whymper survive when the rope breaks under the weight of the four men.  Doré represents the summit triumph here.
~~
from Edward Whymper, Scrambles Amongst the Alps in the Years 1860-69 (1871):  “… at this moment Mr. Hadow slipped, fell against him [Croz], and knocked him over.  I heard one startled exclamation from Croz, then saw him and Mr. Hadow flying downwards; in another moment Hudson was dragged from his steps, and Lord F. Douglas immediately after him.  All this was the work of a moment.  Immediately we heard Croz’s exclamation, old Peter and I planted ourselves as firmly as the rocks would permit: the rope was taught between us, and the jerk came on us both as on one man.  We held; but the rope broke midway between Taugwalder and Lord Francis Douglas.  For a few seconds we saw our unfortunate companions sliding downwards on their backs, and spreading out their hands, endeavoring to save themselves.  They passed from our sight uninjured, disappeared one by one, and fell from precipice to precipice on to the Matterhorngletscher below, a distance of nearly 4,000 feet in height.  From the moment the rope broke it was impossible to help them.  So perished our comrades!”

slickwhippet:

Gustave Doré, Catastrophe du Mont Cervin (1865).  Mont Cervin, French appellation for the Matterhorn.  Hadow, Croz, Hudson and Douglas fall to their deaths following the first successful ascent; the Taugwalder father and son and Whymper survive when the rope breaks under the weight of the four men.  Doré represents the summit triumph here.

~~

from Edward Whymper, Scrambles Amongst the Alps in the Years 1860-69 (1871):  “… at this moment Mr. Hadow slipped, fell against him [Croz], and knocked him over.  I heard one startled exclamation from Croz, then saw him and Mr. Hadow flying downwards; in another moment Hudson was dragged from his steps, and Lord F. Douglas immediately after him.  All this was the work of a moment.  Immediately we heard Croz’s exclamation, old Peter and I planted ourselves as firmly as the rocks would permit: the rope was taught between us, and the jerk came on us both as on one man.  We held; but the rope broke midway between Taugwalder and Lord Francis Douglas.  For a few seconds we saw our unfortunate companions sliding downwards on their backs, and spreading out their hands, endeavoring to save themselves.  They passed from our sight uninjured, disappeared one by one, and fell from precipice to precipice on to the Matterhorngletscher below, a distance of nearly 4,000 feet in height.  From the moment the rope broke it was impossible to help them.  So perished our comrades!”

(via abystle)